Retrofitting Your Attic Insulation

Attic retrofitting (using eco-friendly insulation) is a great way to make your attic insulation more environmentally friendly and energy-saving. When installing insulation in an attic, the goal is to allow less heat to escape from the home, meaning that the home uses less heat energy as a result. Here we break down some of the most common types of attic insulation that an insulation installer may use for attic retrofitting.

Cellulose Insulation

Made from newspaper and other recycled plant-based materials, cellulose insulation is commonly used by an insulation contractor to improve energy efficiency in your home. Cellulose insulation comes in “blocks” which make it relatively easy for an insulation installer to install. This eco-friendly insulation solution is ideal for many homes, allowing you to remain environmentally conscious while warming your property up.

Fiberglass Insulation

Fiberglass insulation is composed of many small pieces of glass that are bound together into one material. The binders that glue the glass together have become more “green” and environmentally friendly in recent decades, allowing fiberglass insulation to be considered as eco-friendly insulation by many insulation contractors. Fiberglass insulation has many forms, including rolls, strips, and loose-fill insulation.

What insulation should I choose for my attic retrofitting?

When it comes to attic retrofitting, both cellulose insulation and fiberglass insulation possess a decent R-value and considerable insulating power. Foam insulation and blown-in insulation are also excellent solutions for installing insulation in an attic, and are suited to different types and designs of attics respectively.

Cellulose insulation and fiberglass insulation have around the same R-value, with both materials coming in at around R-38 for attics and R-13 for walls. R-38 cellulose is 10.77 inches thick, while R-38 fiberglass is 12 inches thick. Cellulose insulation is treated with a special fire retardant, while fiberglass is resistant to fire naturally. It may be worth bearing in mind (during installation) that fiberglass is itchy to human skin and cellulose can be rather “dusty”. Additionally, bear in mind that fiberglass insulation weighs less than cellulose, as this may be important for insulating areas such as garages.

At the end of the day, it’s up to you which insulation you choose for your attic retrofitting. Whether it’s eco-friendly insulation such as cellulose insulation or adaptable insulation such as blown-in insulation, be sure to choose the right type of insulation for your attic and your home’s needs.

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Insulation Labs
CA Lic. #1034380
Tel: (213) 444-5335
Email: [email protected]

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25125 Santa Clara St,
Hayward, CA 94544

1038 E. Bastanchury Rd,
Fullerton, CA 92835

3923 McLaughlin Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90066

 

CALL NOW
(213) 444-5335

 

COMPANY INFO

Insulation Labs
CA Lic. #1034380
Tel: (213) 444-5335
Email: [email protected]

LOCATIONS

7023 Valjean Ave,
Van Nuys, CA 91406

25125 Santa Clara St,
Hayward, CA 94544

1038 E. Bastanchury Rd,
Fullerton, CA 92835

3923 McLaughlin Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90066

 

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HOURS

Mon-Fri:
7:30am-8:00pm
Sat-Sun:
9:00am-3:00pm